“History doesn’t repeat itself, but it does rhyme.”
Anonymous

476 AD is the date that historians have long designated as the year the great Roman Empire came crashing down, and the whole of civilization plunged into chaos and darkness. Well not exactly, the truth is that only half of the empire fell.

 Go East, Young Man!

In 285 AD Emperor Diocletian created the first division of Roman imperial power by establishing what became known as the Tetrarchy, this was a division of sovereignty between four individuals. By the latter part of the 4th century, this division had evolved into two empires, a western governed from Rome and an eastern governed from Constantinople (modern day Istanbul).

Conquest of Constantinople Zonaro Go East, Young Man!  This division was a major contributor to the fall of the empire of the West, but that is another story. To make a long story short, while the Western empire was coming apart, due to mismanagement and constant barbarian incursions, the Eastern or Byzantine empire flourished.  No empire lasts forever, and in 1453 the Byzantine empire came to an abrupt end with the sack of Constantinople by the Turks.

By the time of its collapse, Western Europe had begun to recover, emerging from the medieval period as a collection of states founded on a mixture of Greco-Roman, Judeo-Christian, and Teutonic principles. Rome fell, but the idea of Rome carried on due in large part to the continuity of its Eastern counterpart.

What is interesting is that the East-West political disputes taking place currently in Europe may, in the long run, determine the ultimate survival of European civilization.

The influx of mass numbers of migrants from the Middle East and Africa in Europe has created tremendous political instability. The European Union (or L’empire de Bruxelles) is fomenting a schism by attempting to force its member states to absorb large numbers of refugees. Poland, Hungary, the Czech Republic, Slovakia, Romania, Bulgaria and the former states of Yugoslavia (Slovenia, Croatia, and Serbia) are refusing to comply with E.U. refugee mandates.

Considering the overwhelming chaos that has engulfed western member states it’s incomprehensible why any nation would willing invite such ruin upon its citizens. Unlike the populations of Western Europe, who have been flirting with neo-Marxist ideologies since the end of the Second World War those in east suffered decades of brutal Soviet oppression.

After nearly a century of war and occupation, Eastern Europe is finally enjoying its independence and has been working to restore their national political identities that were systematically dismantled by the Soviets.

220px Visegrad group Go East, Young Man!
This position is counter to what the bureaucrats in Brussels want, for years the E.U. has sought to eradicate nationalistic sentiments and to curtail the sovereignty of its member states.  It is unclear at the moment the extent of autonomy the E.U. wishes to strip away from its member, but one can look to Greece as a template, which has essentially become a vassal of the European state.

The European Union, prior to the refugee crisis was under immense financial pressures that were far from being resolved when the decision was made to absorb millions of immigrants.

This decision has not only had a destabilizing social consequence but has also compounded the current financial crisis to the point of no return. The E.U. is both politically and economically bankrupt, and its people are witnessing their standard of living rapidly deteriorate its eventual collapse is inevitable.

What emerges from the wreckage all depends on what takes place between now and then. If the refugee crisis does not spread and remains confined to the west, then the continuity of European civilization may once again lie in the east.